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Jewish Book Week

Podcasts from our annual festival of art and ideas, held at Kings Place in London.
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 11, 2017

Through their respective works of fiction and poetry, Ruth Gilligan and Simon Lewis tell haunting stories of Ireland’s once-thriving Jewish communities.

Ruth Gilligan’s beautiful and heartbreaking novel Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan spans three generations of Dublin Jews, intertwining their narratives and posing fierce questions about identity and belonging.

Simon Lewis’s award-winning collection of exquisite poems, Jewtown, evokes the vanished community of Cork.

In conversation with journalist and resident of County Cork Jonathan Self.

May 9, 2017

Sweeping and exhilarating, brimming with passion and betrayal, the new works of two well-known writers are compelling page-turners. In her debut novel, A Quiet Life, feminist activist Natasha Walter, author of the iconic Living Dolls, tells a warm-blooded story of Cold War duplicity and deception. In Tightrope, bestselling, prize-winning author Simon Mawer continues the romantic and political exploits of Marian Sutro, protagonist of The Girl Who Fell from the Sky, in a simmering tale of post-war intrigue.

May 4, 2017

Sarit Yishai-Levi’s dazzling The Beauty Queen of Jerusalem is a bestselling novel of stories told and untold, following four generations of a Jerusalem Sephardi family through times of dramatic change. Gerald Jacobs’ Nine Love Letters, based on true events, is the tale of two families who flee their homes in Baghdad and Budapest to seek safety in England. As they deal with the challenges, upheavals and horrors of the Holocaust, their fates become intertwined after an unlikely twist of fate. The authors discuss their books with Baroness Rabbi Julia Neuberger.

May 2, 2017

Claire Hajaj’s assured and ambitious debut Ishmael’s Oranges and Dorit Rabinyan’s prizewinning All the Rivers are spellbinding novels exploring the faultlines that threaten the likelihood of enduring love between Arab and Jew. In a captivating narrative of love and loss, Ishmael's Oranges tells the story of two families against the background of repeated conflicts to examine whether love can transcend the legacy of hatred.

In a momentous tale, crisscrossed by physical and emotional borderlines, Dorit Rabinyan’s All the Rivers courageously demarcates an intimate short-term space for two, far from the tensions and fissures that create the separation between ‘us’ and ‘them’. In conversation with the director of the forthcoming M-Fest, critic Arifa Akbar.

Sponsored by the New Israel Fund. In association with Profile.

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